Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Beyond Charts / Re: FORMULA & INDICATOR SHARED LIBRARY
« Last post by JohnR on 19/04/2019, 02:57:40 PM »
Ok have a working script to filter for MACD Weekly and MACD Daily scans" thanks.
Not sure of the logic behind having two separate scripts for a. stock filter, and b. graphic signal, as the one script seems to do both presently (graphic symbols saved as overlay F key with additional technical indicators).

Filter scan for weekly data MACD 100 (about equal to a MACD 260 Daily data):

{------------------------------------------------}
{Macd 1 Long 100,50-30}
MACD1:= mov(C, 100, E) - mov(C, 50, E);
MACD1sig := mov(MACD1, 30, E);
MACD1hist := (MACD1-MACD1sig);

{Macd 2 Medium 50, 24-18}
MACD2:= mov(C, 50, E) - mov(C, 24, E);
MACD2sig := mov(MACD2, 18, E);
MACD2hist := (MACD2-MACD2sig);

MACD3:= mov(C, 12, E) - mov(C, 26, E);
MACD3sig := mov(MACD3, 9, E);
MACD3hist := (MACD3-MACD3sig);


{Alert: Macd Medium Main crosses signal line, M1 histogram rising x nos bars }
MACD2_xUP := Cross(MACD2sig, MACD2)
AND (MACD1hist>REF(MACD1hist,-2)
AND MOV(CLOSE,21,S) * MOV(VOLUME,21,S) >= 50000);

{ Alert signal holds signal TRUE for 5 bars or whatever number you choose}
Alert_MACD2 := Alert (MACD2_xUP, 5);

{ Testing the output contents }
Alert_MACD2;
{------------------------------------------------}


And Daily data MACD 260:

{------------------------------------------------}
{Macd 1 Long 260,120-90}
MACD1:= mov(C, 260, W) - mov(C, 120, W);
MACD1sig := mov(MACD1, 90, W);
MACD1hist := (MACD1-MACD1sig);

{Macd 2 Medium 100, 50-30}
MACD2:= mov(C, 100, E) - mov(C, 50, E);
MACD2sig := mov(MACD2, 30, E);


{Alert: Macd Medium Main crosses signal line, M1 histogram rising x nos bars }
MACD2_xUP := Cross(MACD2sig, MACD2)
AND (MACD1hist>REF(MACD1hist,-2)
AND MOV(CLOSE,21,S) * MOV(VOLUME,21,S) >= 50000);

{ Alert signal holds signal TRUE for 5 bars or whatever number you choose}
Alert_MACD2 := Alert (MACD2_xUP, 5);

{ Testing the output contents }
Alert_MACD2;
{------------------------------------------------}



But when I attempt a fast MACD "turning up by 2 bars or so from running down" (below zero) script to run on the above MACD scan results watch list, nothing seems to work:
(I take it the MACD greater than MACD 1 bar back means the indicator is rising no falling) as the MACD index is greater as it falls lower than zero and above zero?
I'll be using this indicator / histogram turning state quite a lot so would like to know how the code should read.

{------------------------------------------------}
MACD3:= mov(C, 12, E) - mov(C, 50, E);
MACD3sig := mov(MACD3, 25, E);
MACD3hist := (MACD3sig-MACD3);

MACD3_UP:= (MACD3 <0 AND MACD3 > REF(MACD3,-1) AND (MACD3,-1 < REF(MACD3,-2)));

{Alert: Macd Fast turning up, hold x nos of bars }
Alert_MACD3 := Alert (MACD3_UP, 3);

{ Testing the output contents }
Alert_MACD3;
{------------------------------------------------}


OUTPUT= -> There is no function defined. Please define your function with valid arguments

2
Beyond Charts / Re: FORMULA & INDICATOR SHARED LIBRARY
« Last post by Campbell Sinclair on 15/04/2019, 02:29:13 PM »
I would definitely do it that way - have one script for the chart and another for finding the signal to be used in scans.

In terms of the intention, with M2_xUP to be clear, as code is now you are asking if the 100 day MACD signal has gone above the 100 day MACD and that the M1histogram is higher than itself -2.

So to look for a value bars ago, use the REF() function. REF(<something>, -1) grabs the value of "something" a singe bar back. Something is not valid or tangible, just an example. Below is how it should look for looking 2 bars back:

{Alert: Macd Medium Main crosses signal line, M1 histogram rising x nos bars }
M2_xUP := Cross(M2sig, M2) and (M1hist>REF(M1hist,-2));

Now with the script as a whole - this is one of those scripting issues where a "clear" error is not apparent until you have run in to it 1 or 2 times then you will understand the logic behind it. By saying "M2" is not defined - it is saying it has found M2 but it does not know what to do with it. It's a total unknown.

The cause in this instance is with M1hist - it needs a semi colon on the end:

M1hist := (M1-M1sig) to M1hist := (M1-M1sig);

This says M1hist has ended, so it is free to assume  that M2 will be a variable name.
3
Beyond Charts / Re: FORMULA & INDICATOR SHARED LIBRARY
« Last post by JohnR on 14/04/2019, 02:11:40 PM »
OK I will get to the system formula later once I get the intended alerts and scanning correct, as the 'systems' are slightly more complex.

Just to clarify the intention:
a) signal for MACD 100 crossing Signal with the following qualifier;
b) MACD(260) is greater than MACD(260) 2 bars back hold signal for 5 bars.

This will get some early potential trender's into the watch list.

I take it there will need to be two scripts; one for the graphic alerts plotted onto charts and setup as an 'overlay', and one for the actual filter screener with qualifiers?

When the above is working I will then add other screener qualifiers for value and volume, and or one of the system indicators like RSC ranking and ROC(126), ATRVe (15) to pull into the scan more 'system' like stocks.
What would be good here would be something that leads into the ATR-TS Investor signal prior to it happening (SIROC?) from my observance the MACD(100) crossing its signal line with MACD(260) rising for more than a few bars does a pretty good job for the 5 to 15 bars prior to the ATR-TS signal.

So with that in mind; that is the MACD plan for now.

Formula as it is now (not saving):
{------------------------------------------------}
{Macd 1 Long 260,120-90}
M1:= mov(C, 260, W) - mov(C, 120, W);
M1sig := mov(M1, 90, W);
M1hist := (M1-M1sig)

{Macd 2 Medium 100, 50-30}
M2:= mov(C, 100, E) - mov(C, 50, E);
M2sig := mov(M2, 30, E);

{Alert: Macd Medium Main crosses signal line, M1 histogram rising x nos bars }
M2_xUP := Cross(M2sig, M2) and (M1hist>M1hist-2);

{ Alert signal holds signal TRUE for 5 bars or whatever number you choose}
Alert_M2 := Alert (M2_xUP, 5);

{ Testing the output contents }
Alert_M2;
{------------------------------------------------}


Output -> Identifier M2 is not defined

I've been over this a few times and can't see why the M2 is not defined. The "M2_xUP := Cross(M2sig, M2)" part works by itself giving the correct cross over direction.
4
SPA3 for ASX / Re: WOW buy back
« Last post by Jennifer S on 09/04/2019, 06:18:16 PM »
It does help thanks Paul. Makes more sense so if we had a crystal ball to know what would happen at market after the few day average price .... Oh for the crystal..
5
SPA3 for ASX / Re: WOW buy back
« Last post by Paul M on 09/04/2019, 05:37:26 PM »
Hi Jennifer,

The reason for selling at less than the market price is that Franking Credits also need to be counted in the overall return to the seller.
So, if WOW are at $30 on-market (make the numbers easy!) with a discount of 14% off the market price, then it would be sold for $25.80 in the offer (discount is $4.20). But, for tax purposes, the sale price is comprised of a capital component of $4.79, with any excess above that treated as a fully franked dividend. Using the above amounts, this would mean that the dividend component in the sale price would be about $21. The franking credit amount on this would be about $6.30 (0.3 x $21). So the overall return to the seller is about $32.10 ($25.80 + $6.30). This is much better than the on-market return of $30 (but the seller would have to wait until tax time to get the FC part of the sale).
Pages 11 and 16 of the Offer Document gives further information about this.
Hope that helps
6
SPA3 for ASX / Re: WOW buy back
« Last post by Jennifer S on 04/04/2019, 03:01:16 PM »
That's what I don't understand. Selling at a guaranteed loss (unless it's only equal to the loss of brokerage + tax on Cap Gain), the discount if it benefits the company and therefore remaining share holders, Why would anyone in their right mind sell at less than the market price ??
7
SPA3 for ASX / Re: WOW buy back
« Last post by Campbell Sinclair on 04/04/2019, 11:39:35 AM »
Hi Jennifer,

The WOW share buyback is notably a, off-market, purchase of shares from their shareholders. There is a tender process described at length in a booklet available on the ASX website dated 01/04/2019: https://www.asx.com.au/asx/share-price-research/company/WOW

Essentially the final price offered in the buy back is not set and will not be known until the tender process is complete which is pencilled in to be 27th May 2019. Otherwise it will be based on this formula (page 13 / 63) if someone did not wish to wait that long to take up the offer:

Quote from: Woolworths Booklet
A = B x (1 - C)

Where:

A is the Buy-Back Price (rounded to the nearest cent (and for the avoidance of doubt, rounded up in the case of a half a cent) or rounded up as appropriate, if rounding to the nearest cent would involve a discount of greater than 14% to the Market Price(subscript: 1));

B is the Market Price; and

C is the Final Buy-Back Discount.

For example, if the Market Price is A$30.00 and the Final Buy-Back Discount is 14%, the Buy-Back Price would be A$25.802 (i.e. A$30.00 x (1 - 0.14))

Then these shares are taken off the market altogether, at a price which calculated to be below the fluctuating day to day market price.

So definitely this is another variable that affects the share price as selling at a guaranteed loss so quickly may entice someone somewhere - it is impossible to know with certainty. All we can do is react to the price action the market offers us, so this buyback to a mechanical investor only really joins the known variables that exist alongside unknown variables which drive market movements.
8
SPA3 for ASX / WOW buy back
« Last post by Jennifer S on 03/04/2019, 05:43:35 PM »
Hi again
I'm wondering how buy backs work and affect share price. Currently WOW are planning a buy back the process of which will begin soon. I guess this will probably affect the share price and therefore signals. Does anyone foresee how the price may be affected?? thanks
9
General Discussion / Chit Chat / Re: SLF and the property market
« Last post by Jennifer S on 03/04/2019, 01:22:11 PM »
Dave and Gary, thanks for that
10
General Discussion / Chit Chat / Re: SLF and the property market
« Last post by Gary Stone on 02/04/2019, 04:53:21 PM »
Jennifer,

To add to David's response, most of the media falling property prices talk has been about residential property. SLF is the ETF for the ASX200 Listed Property Trusts, which is large commercial property.

Residential and commercial property don't move in sync with each other.

Regards
Gary
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10